What is a “broken” shear on your boats and why is it important? Do you have a schematic or drawing with the nomenclature and design features normally found on boats? I make marine cupronickel heat exchangers and I don’t know diddly about boats and my customers are always throwing these terms around.


Good afternoon and thank you for your inquiry. A broken sheer is a term used for boats when the sheer (rail) has a slight curvature on the aft end as compared to a solid straight line leading from the bow. It is where the sheer meets the intermediate bumper. Instead of a long sweeping sheer line from bow to stern, it turns down somewhat abruptly as it nears the cockpit (Click on the image to the right with attention to the broken sheer).

This is mainly just the style we choose for our custom sport fishing boats to give the vessel an exclusive and unique look. A broken sheer is considered by many to be an integral part of the “classic” Carolina look.

If you have any other questions regarding our custom yachts please don’t hesitate to ask. Thank you again for your time.

1 Comment

  1. Jarrett Bay Boatworks

    In writing this post, we came across the question of the correct spelling of the term sheer vs. shear. We’ve seen it used both ways in the context of marine design, and our research has led to the conclusion that shEEr is the correct modern spelling, while shEAr, is the “Old English” way.


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