Jarrett Bay Boatworks

6 Comments

  1. Jim Foley

    A very impressive process, but may I ask why the boat had to be disassembled in the first place? Was it somehow landlocked? How does pulling it apart and putting it back together compare price-wise to running it where ever it needed to go on it’s own bottom. I have a Hatteras 55C in Clearwater that I am running north to Chicago in the spring. I’ve never given any thought to taking the bridge off and putting it on a truck, assuming one could truck a 17’6″ beam. And of course there is no JB in Chicago.

    Jim Foley

    1. Jarrett Bay Boatworks

      Good Morning Sir,

      In the case of Mr. Harpers 59’ Carver, it was a land locked vessel. It came from a lake in Oklahoma. Land locked vessels can be very good deals for several reasons.

      They have been operated in fresh water therefore the raw water side of all operating machinery is in much better condition than that operated in a harsh salt environment.

      Also there would be a very limited number of qualified purchasers for a large land locked vessel like this. Most land locked vessels are much smaller. A seller of such a large land locked vessel would find it more difficult to sell their vessel so buyers that are willing to contract trucking firms to move a large vessel can get some very good deals.

      It is a costly proposition to move a large vessel over a long distance by truck and will normally be a onetime solution. It is not meant to be an alternative to transiting on a vessels own bottom. Transporting small vessels by truck over long distances is much more efficient. Fuel costs being what they are can be exorbitant and the long hours on the equipment is harsh and thereby reduces the overall value of the vessel due to accelerated depreciation. All trucked vessels will have to be no more than 13’ 6” high and not wider than 10’ to be considered economical. The permitting process for transporting large vessels is expensive and time consuming. The larger the vessel the more expensive it is. Heights over 13’ 6” and wider than 10’ require special routing and flag vehicles. Each states permitting process is different so it can be very expensive if you are transporting over long distances.

      In the case of the Carver, the vessel was designed with transporting over the highway in mind and it is easy to disassemble and reassemble this vessel design compared to your Hatteras.

      I hope I have answered your question. Please contact me if I may be of further assistance.

      Jeff Fulcher
      Yard Manager

  2. Larry

    That is a feat disassembling and the R/A of a 506 , let alone cribbing it on the goose neck. Nice Job if you have any questions on r/a or wire pulls feel free to email me.

  3. katkisson

    We recently bought a 40′ Carver. It was 2 hours away via car, 6 days away via river. We choose river. Cost several thousand in gas but was an adventure of a lifetime. It took us 6 days via river. We were given our options and chose not to have ours broken down into two pieces and put back together. Did not want issues at a later date. Of course, we did have the one (expensive) optioin. All in all – we love our Carver and I am sure they will absolutely love this one.

  4. Robert

    I have a land lock 506 in OK. About how much did it cost to break down and put together . Not counting the mileage

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